The object of study of the research group are the mechanisms that regulate the metamorphosis of insects , and how these mechanisms have evolved from ancestral species, with a gradual metamorphosis (like in cockroaches or locusts), to the most modified species, with a discontinuous metamorphosis (like in butterflies or flies). Therefore, the questions that the research group on the Evolution of insect metamorphosis seek to answer are: How did metamorphosis develop in insects? What endocrine and molecular mechanisms led to the evolutionary transition from gradual to discontinuous metamorphosis?

Lab website: Bellés Lab

 

Principal Investigator Principal Investigator

Current members Current members

Ongoing projects Ongoing projects

Publications Publications

Dillon, M. B. C.; Sulchten, V.; Oseroff, C.; Paul, S.; Dullanty, L. M.; Frazier, A.; Belles, X.; Piulachs, M. D.; [4 authors]; Sidney, J.; Peters, B.; Sette, A. 2015. Different Bla-g T cell antigens dominate responses in asthma versus rhinitis subjects. Clinical & Experimental Allergy 45(12): 1856-1867.


Belles, X.; Ylla, G. 2015. Towards understanding the molecular basis of cockroach tergal gland morphogenesis. A transcriptomic approach.  Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 63(0): 104-112.


Belles, X.; Piulachs, M-D. 2015. Ecdysone signalling and ovarian development in insects: from stem cells to ovarian follicle formation. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Gene Regulatory Mechanisms 1849(2): 181-186.


Patiño-Navarrete, R.; Piulachs, M.D.; Belles, X.; Moya, A.; Latorre, A.; and Peretó, J. 2014. The cockroach Blattella germanica obtains nitrogen from uric acid through a metabolic pathway shared with its bacterial endosymbiont. Biology Letters 10 (7)